All posts filed under: dry fasting

Dry fasting

When you tell most people you’re thinking of doing a dry fast – that is, a fast in which you eat or drink nothing at all – they think you’re crazy.  That either you’re a crazy religious fanatic.  Or that you’re just crazy-crazy, with a tendency towards suicide.  Here in the modern world, we’re conditioned to believe that fasting without water is plain and simple stupid, if not dangerous, with little or no possible health benefits. I week ago I might have said the same thing. Like everyone else, I had formed a judgement not based on knowledge and experience but upon ignorance and fear.  This fear is ingrained at the very heart of our modern consumer society.  Consume, consume, consume: this includes the ‘need’ to eat and drink almost constantly, as much as the ‘need’ to go shopping and travel on expensive holidays.  We are like the “hungry ghosts” described in Tibetan Buddhism: insatiable beings with huge mouths, constantly trying to fulfil our inner needs through devouring the outside world…  Modern consumer society conditions …

5 day dry fast with 2 day introductory water fast

The following article outlines the experience of my first 5-day dry fast. I do not recommend such a long dry fast to anyone, unless they already have plenty of experience with both 7-day water fasts as well as 3-day dry fasts!   A fast has been in the air for a while now. First, my last multi-day fast took place already half a year ago, and my body’s been asking for some general cleansing over the last month or two. Second, and more specifically, I’ve had nagging and quite severe tendonitis in my wrists since last autumn. (Too much bad typing technique on the laptop, combined with way too much heavy DIY building work last summer!) I wanted to spend some time dealing with this, especially because I feel as though the chronic inflammation in my wrists is slowly seeping out and spreading an underlying inflammation into the rest of my body. Why a 5-day dry fast? And why precede this immediately with 2 days of water fasting? In an ideal world, the best thing …

3.5 / 4 day dry fast with introductory water fast

I’ve always approached dry fasting carefully. As a generally healthy person, I’ve never had any therapeutic need to jump into a radically long fast. Also, having experienced firsthand how much stronger the detox of dry fasting is compared to water fasting, I’ve always felt that it’s better to be safe than sorry – especially given the general lack of reliable information about dry fasting. Up until now, I’ve experimented with 36-hour, 48-hour (2 day) and 60-hour (2.5 day) dry fasts. I’ve only ever increased the length incrementally, once I’ve felt totally comfortable with the previous duration. My first ever dry fast lasted 36 hours, which was more of a challenge psychologically than physically. After acclimatising to that length, I moved up to 48- and then 60-hour dry fasts, the length of which began to be determined instead by very physical factors. By the last 12 hours of each, my body would start giving me signs that I was pushing my natural limit, and so I respected this. I would strongly emphasise that anyone considering a …

2.5 day dry fast: dehydration as detox

This article describes my first experience of a 2.5-day dry fast.  For more information about dry fasts in general click here, and for my experience with shorter 36-hour dry fasts click here. Dehydration as detox: the phrase came to mind soon after finishing my fast earlier this week.  More than just an intellectual construct, dehydration as detox was something I experienced, felt and understood for the first time on a very bodily level.  My first two 36-hour dry fasts provided a taster of this, but it’s only with the second full day of fasting that the process begins to work on a deeper level. In his book Dry Medical Fasting: myths and reality, Dr. Sergei Filonov describes how the body contains areas in which bodily fluid in the intercellular space is never fully washed out under normal circumstances.  Like swamps in the external world, these internal ‘marshes’ provide an ideal breeding ground for bacteria, viruses and microbes – just as stagnant water invites mosquitos.  In addition, toxins which find their way into these internal reservoirs …

36-hour dry fast

Originally written several years ago, this article describes my first experiences with 36-hour dry fasts. Over the weekend I did another 36-hour dry fast: my second in just over a month.  In this article I’ll lay out my experiences and impressions of both.  For general information about dry fasting, please click here. I first discovered dry fasting a couple of months ago.  Before that, of course I’d heard of the concept of not eating or drinking, but – like most modern Westerners – had written the idea off as something for just religious nutters.  Surely, without water, there could be no cleansing and no possible physical benefits…  Then I started reading the work of Dr. Sergei Filonov, and realised how fear and ignorance have distorted our perception of this ancient practice. I became intrigued by the idea of dry fasting.  First, as someone who has years of experience with water fasting, I was interested by the idea of an even more powerful method to detoxify and cleanse the body.  Second, there was a kind of …